asylum-art:

NeSpoon Polska: Lace Street Art
  on Behance
Warsaw-based artist NeSpoon uses ornate lace patterns in her unique brand of street art that translates into ceramics, stencils, paintings, and crocheted webbing installed in public spaces. NeSpoon refers to her art as “public jewelry,” specifically as an act of beautification by turning abandoned and unadorned spaces into something aesthetically pleasing. You can see much more over Warsaw-based artist NeSpoon uses ornate lace patterns in her unique brand of street art that translates into ceramics, stencils, paintings, and crocheted webbing installed in public spaces. NeSpoon refers to her art as “public jewelry,” specifically as an act of beautification by turning abandoned and unadorned spaces into something aesthetically pleasing.

paperlanternlit:

bookpatrol:

Minnesota: Land of 10,000 lakes and 1 floating library

There are lakes everywhere in Minnesota and now one of them has a floating library.

Thanks to Sarah Peters the contraption above is open for business on Cedar Lake in Minneapolis. Designed by Molly Reichert the 8 foot structure will hold upwards of 80 books for water travelers to peruse and check out.

Canoes, kayaks, paddle boards, skiffs, rowboats, or even inner tubes are invited to paddle up to the Library and browse the shelves from inside their watercraft. The library has both circulating and reference collections of artists’ books contributed by artists nationwide. A staff of friendly floating librarians facilitate the check out process and make reading suggestions

There are even drop off boxes on the shore to return the books.

About the project, Peters told the Minneapolis Star Tribune “Art books are not a widely known art form..And so there’s an element of delight and surprise. First of all, canoeing along and coming across a library. And then having it stocked with books that are totally unique. It’s like this double whammy of inventiveness. It can expand people’s ideas of what art is.”

True enough but it could also ruin a lot of those unique books. Granted one cannot enter the library but the confluence of books and water rarely ends well.

Perhaps a shore-based library by the landing dock could have achieved the goal of exposing people to the pleasures of book arts and artists books without  the high risk. But then again maybe the reward is in the risk.

Story at the Star Tribune: The land of 10,000 lakes now has a floating library 

Floating Library website

Flickr set of the Floating Library, 2013

h/t Shelf Awareness

This is so cool. Would defiantly check out a floating bookshop. Although, it does sound a little dangerous for the books!

~Intern Tori~

Yay for Minnesota!

(via yahighway)

luxuryaccommodations:

The Urban Treehouse - Berlin, Germany

Set in a 650 sqm garden at the edge of Grunewald Forest, yet close enough to the hectic urban life of Berlin, lies The Urban Treehouse, a very special place consisting of two tree-shaped houses perched 4 meters off the ground level. Designed by Andreas Wenning from Baumraum - a leading architecture firm specialized in treehouses, the two innovative accommodation modules come with clean, cutting-edge design and bright, contemporary interiors appointed with all modern luxuries, from fully-equipped bathrooms and kitchenettes to plasma TVs and fresh, versatile furnishings.

Website

ALWAYS REBLOG THE TREEHOUSES

jackviolet:

One of the things that is really notable about Moscow and yet not many people outside Russia know about, is how gorgeous the Moscow metro is.

These photos? That’s what the metro stations look like.

Yeah.

They’re called the “People’s palaces of Moscow” or else “Underground palaces,” and they were built during the Soviet era on the Communist idea that art and beauty should belong to the people rather than only being available in the houses of nobles.

These photos show just some of the metro’s attractions. There are many more mosaics, statues, etc, placed throughout.

And the metro is always this clean.

In addition to being beautiful, it is incredibly functional. It gets you pretty much everywhere in Moscow, and the trains run at intervals of every three minutes or less. At peak times, they run every 90 seconds. You never have to worry about missing a train, because the next one will come almost immediately.

Not always of course. In the late evening or early morning hours, you may have to wait as long as five whole minutes for a train. They’re also super easy to navigate.

We Russians are pretty proud of our metro system.

(via colinmorgasms)